Black Mesa State Park

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When you think of the state of Oklahoma, you might envision one of a very short list of things:

(1) The strange political nature of some of the area’s politicians

(2) Wheat and cattle, flowing over a flatly monotonous expanse

Oklahoma may have both of these things in excess, but it is also a land of surprising diversity. In it is contained a part of the wet and scenic Ozark Plateau, the Arbuckle and Wichita Mountains, the expansive and refractile salt flats in the north, the wet and sticky southeastern swamps, the deciduous forests of the east, and, of course, the plains regions. In the panhandle are plains and desert leading to the highest point in the state: Black Mesa, which stands at almost 5,000 feet elevation on the Oklahoma-New Mexico-Colorado border.

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